June 06, 2009

Jan-Erik Svennberg, Lilla Istanbul/Little Istanbul


first two pictures (july 2007) courtesy of Mats Karlsson 

Life and works

Already as a youg man Jan-Erik Svennberg (b. 1944) from the city of Sala in Sweden, became interested in the culture of Turkey. During his service in the army he teached himself some turkish by means of swedish-turkish dictionary. When he was around age thirty he began making his first small wooden replicas of turkish buildings.

The event that would influence his life happened in 1979 when he made a group trip to Bulgary. He then could make a three-day trip to Istanbul and although he was a bit confused by the bustle of the city, he became fascinated by it's atmosphere, and he especially was impressed by the mosques he had visited.

Back home Svennberg began making a large-scale replica of a mosque, which he displayed in the garden of the house in Sala where he lived with his parents. His father was a bit afraid that the neighbours wouldn't be amused by this activity, but this turned out better then expected. Over the years there was actually no comment, not negative, but not positive as well....

Since he started around 1979, Svennberg has made some twenty smaller and larger models, all displayed in the garden around the house.


Svennberg not only has made these constructions, but he also developed his interest in various aspects of Turkish cultural life, reading stories about turkish history and about famous turkish personalities, which he also depicted in paintings, as the picture below shows.

this picture and the next three (2014) 
courtesy of Simon Turner

In his midsixties, Svennberg stopped making constructions. Meanwhile (2015) his parents are deceased and Svennberg, living alone in the parental home, is active in taking care of his creations and receiving visitors, who come from many countries around the world to see his art environment.


On appointment visitors are welcome to visit the site. In Sweden people know about Svennberg's work, also because he appeared in a popular television series (100 höjdare, 2004-2008). 

interior of the blue-colored mosque

Svennberg's passion for mosques is architecturally and aesthetically inspired and has no relation whatever with the recent public debate in european countries about Islam in western scoiety.


Documentation
* Svennberg's work has been featured, together with creations of other nordic self-taught artists, in an exposition Annan Konst (Other Art), which in 2009 and 2010 travelled through Sweden, Norway and Finland.
* Video (2007, 8'45", Youtube) from the 100 Höjdare tv series 


first published june 2009, revised april 2015

Jan-Erik Svennberg
Lilla Istanbul
Annedal 100
73336 Sala, SE
can be visited on appointment

5 comments:

  1. it never ceases to amaze me how wonderful human imagination is. The little things that inspire us and drive us on to do the things we do. :-D

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  2. Hey Henk, hope all is well in Holland... I wonder if the insides of these models are as detailed as the outsides ? What incredible patience it must take to design and then build one of these... I wonder how long each model takes from start to finish ?
    Best wishes, Owen

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  3. Another great post Henk. Certainly many people may assume its a Svennberg´s statement of religious affiliation, when, as it is clear for those free of political approaches, inspiration came after an unforgetable experience. According to swedish doctors, here we have a case of "Asperger syndrome" ( a rubbish for me, what a terrible disease imagination is)Svenska dagbladet wrote a whole article focusing more in facts like these, rather than in the tecnique, inner motivations, etc. Certainly his wonderful art doesn´t need a media camapaign, neither his mental condition to be made a fetiche. (Van Gogh quickly comes to my mind)"It´s a terrifying world", Mr. Svennberg said in that same interview, "I like nothing but to wake up early and read a little on Turkish history, Russian revolution and World War I and so, later to work in my art" What a lucky man Mr Svennberg is.

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  4. Yes watercats, imagination, that´s what this is all about. In my posts I try to abstain as much as possible from psychologoical or psychiatric interpretations of the makers of these creations. I agree with you, Alberto Oliver, that one should look at mr Svenbergs work from a point of view of inspiration, as he had an unforgettable experience, that was decisive for the rest of his life. I just mentionned his asperger because he had talked about it himself (Probably in reply to a question of the reporter about this!)
    Owen, thanks for the remarks. As far as I know, the inside of the creations are decorated too, but I am afraid I do not know how much time it would take to construct them. (A long time, I suppose...)

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  5. Hi Henk, A couple of months back I made a little hitch hiking trip over to this from Stockholm. It was wonderful. The constructions are much bigger than they seem. I crawled inside the main one (the blue) and stood up in there. It was designed inside too. He's a lovely man and really likes having visitors and showing them, proudly showing me his visitor book and naming the countries. He has also a little art gallery and is clearly an accomplished painter. I have lots of photos if you'd like to see them Henk. All the best, Simon.

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